Omega 3’s, More Salmon Please

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Baked salmon with red rice and kale

While I have been a strict vegetarian, and even a vegan at times, I am currently a pescetarian and can’t deny that I love seafood.  Fortunately, I’ve been reading about numerous studies lately that have shown fish can be very beneficial to one’s diet.

Fish tends to be full of omega 3‘s, healthy fats that are good for the heart.  While you might associate fat as being bad, a little of the good kind is in fact essential for life.  Omega 3’s are said to decrease the risk of heart attacks and heart disease, as well as promote healthy brain function.  Along with my regular exercise regiment, it looks like my heart should be set and my brain should be sharp to help keep me working my way through school (knock on wood)!

If you happen to be a vegetarian, there are other ways to obtain omega 3’s, such as consuming certain nuts (walnuts and flax seeds are good sources).  However, omega 3’s aren’t something the human body can produce on its own, making fish a good source of these essential fatty acids.

According to webMD omega 3’s help to boost immune function as well as decrease the risk of ADHD, a disorder that too many kids are being prescribed drugs for these days.  The omega 3’s in fish have also been shown to help protect vision and decrease risk of dementia.

Aside from the omega 3’s, fish is also loaded with protein, helping to build and secure strong muscles.  Taking a look at my favorite fish, salmon, an 8 oz portion has approximately 45 grams of protein.  Thats about 90% of your daily needs!  Salmon is also loaded with vitamin D, B vitamins, selenium, and magnesium.

However, when buying salmon or any other fish, opt for wild.  Not only do wild fish tend to be higher in omega 3’s, but there are also a whole slew of ethical reasons on why to go wild.  Farm raised fish are also typically fed antibiotics, which along with other toxins such as PCBs and pesticides, are then transferred to the consumer.  Colored dye is also used in farm raised salmon to make it appear more appealing, so go natural and choose wild.

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Rockfish with sauteed mushrooms, kabocha squash, and broccoli

Many researchers currently recommend consuming fish 2-3 times per week.  However, make sure to limit consumption of fish that contain high amounts of mercury, such as tuna.  Mercury can cause long term damage to the kidneys, nervous system, digestive system, and various other parts of the body.  Check out this site to learn about which varieties of fish contain high amounts and which contain low amounts of mercury.  Luckily, salmon’s on the low-level list!

Also, check out this site, which provides a list of fish that aren’t over-fished and are believed to be within sustainable and acceptable fishing levels.

If you’re looking for an easy protein, omega-3 boosted meal, pick up a piece of fish, turn on the oven, and bake away.  Fish can be so easy to make, by simply lightly coating it with olive oil, S&P, and baking until tender.  Squeeze on a little lemon, and there you go-  Simple, delicious, and healthy!

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No Comments

  • Reply
    Simply Life
    November 2, 2009 at 6:04 pm

    I love salmon and this meal looks great!

  • Reply
    Annelle Williams
    November 2, 2009 at 10:32 pm

    Thanks for checking out the sweet potato gnocchi! I fluctuate from being a seriously healthy eater, to being just a serious eater…but I can always tell a big difference in how I feel!

  • Reply
    luke
    November 3, 2009 at 11:39 am

    Hello, I am a webmaster of a health related site. Recently I have contact many other webmasters of health related sites, and we have created a “group.” This group will be used to link each other sites to on another in order for all of us to get more visitors and readers, in order to get good information out there, I was wondering if you would like to join this “group” if interested send me an email at wahoo94@yahoo.com. Thanks for your time and hope to hear from you soon!

  • Reply
    theskinnyplate
    November 3, 2009 at 6:56 pm

    Thanks for the tips on fish. I love my omega-3’s. Best way to get it is from natural foods.

  • Reply
    Allie (Live Laugh Eat)
    November 3, 2009 at 8:03 pm

    I’ve been eating a pescatarian diet the last couple of months too. I love seafood WAY too much!! My favorite is shrimp, scallops, and calamari!!

  • Reply
    lilveggiepatch
    November 3, 2009 at 10:00 pm

    I LOVE seafood. I cut it out for a year in high school, but had to go right back!

  • Reply
    eatmovelove
    November 3, 2009 at 10:12 pm

    Love this post! Yeah, I could never give up fish or chicken (despite the seemingly abundant bloggers that are either vegan, vegetarian or raw!)…I don’t eat much red meat anyways – but I like not feeling that something is off-limits.

    And, I had salmon tonight too!!! I grilled it on the ‘Foreman’ with a whack of veggies and sweet potato fries – yum!!! I also had it with spaghetti sauce (too much as usual) and mustard…weird I know – I need to cut back on the condiments 🙁

  • Reply
    Mary
    November 11, 2009 at 3:48 pm

    Vegetarians can get a serving of Omega-3 from a handful of Brazil nuts or from flax seed.

    Foods that contain appreciable amounts of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the vegetarian omega-3:

    Canola oil
    English walnuts
    Flax oil*
    Flax seed (ground)*
    Hemp beverages (hemp “milk”)
    Hemp oil*
    Hemp seed / hemp nut (ground)*
    Olive oil
    Leafy green vegetables (small amounts, but a good omega-3 to omega-6 ratio)
    Pumpkin seeds
    Soybeans
    Soybean oil
    Supplements
    *highest sources

    Doses In Perspective

    Vegetarians and vegans are not more likely to be deficient in omega-3s compared to meat-eaters. It is fairly easy for everyone consuming a balanced diet to meet the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations for alpha-linolenic acid intake; equivalent to 0.6% – 1.2% of daily energy.

    A typical adult consuming 2000 calories per day would need about 1.3 – 2.7 grams ALA per day; equalling about one-quarter of a teaspoon of flax seed oil, less than a tablespoon of walnuts or 1.3 tablespoons of soybean oil. But don’t worry about numbers – a balanced diet is very unlikely to be deficient.
    http://vegetariancuisine.suite101.com/article.cfm/vegetarian_omega3_sources

  • Reply
    Mary
    November 11, 2009 at 3:49 pm

    http://vegetariancuisine.suite101.com/article.cfm/vegetarian_omega3_sources

    egetarians and vegans, like everyone else, need a source of omega-3 in their diets. Omega-3s are essential to good health.

    Foods that contain appreciable amounts of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the vegetarian omega-3:

    Canola oil
    English walnuts
    Flax oil*
    Flax seed (ground)*
    Hemp beverages (hemp “milk”)
    Hemp oil*
    Hemp seed / hemp nut (ground)*
    Olive oil
    Leafy green vegetables (small amounts, but a good omega-3 to omega-6 ratio)
    Pumpkin seeds
    Soybeans
    Soybean oil
    Supplements
    *highest sources

    Doses In Perspective

    Vegetarians and vegans are not more likely to be deficient in omega-3s compared to meat-eaters. It is fairly easy for everyone consuming a balanced diet to meet the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations for alpha-linolenic acid intake; equivalent to 0.6% – 1.2% of daily energy.

    A typical adult consuming 2000 calories per day would need about 1.3 – 2.7 grams ALA per day; equalling about one-quarter of a teaspoon of flax seed oil, less than a tablespoon of walnuts or 1.3 tablespoons of soybean oil. But don’t worry about numbers – a balanced diet is very unlikely to be deficient.

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