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Beautiful

Asian Cabbage Slaw

Asian Cabbage Slaw

Cabbage is among the most underrated vegetables.

Er, let me correct that. Purple cabbage is among the most underrated vegetables.

I mean, just look at it! It’s a beaut.

Asian Cabbage Slaw

One of purple cabbage’s greatest attributes – besides its color, of course – is the fact that it can last for weeks and weeks in the fridge before going bad. That being said, I always keep a head on hand so that I can thinly slice it up whenever a dish could use a splash of color.

Salads, banh mi sandwiches, summery tacos, grain bowls, you name it…purple cabbage is always there to save the day and make food beautiful.

Asian Cabbage Slaw

This time around, however, I let the vibrant veggie take center stage in a slaw I now make every summer.

It’s an Asian-influenced cole slaw, meaning that traditional mayo gets swapped with a fragrant oil + rice vinegar + soy sauce combo.

Add a few crunchy, salty peanuts on top and some fresh cilantro, and you’re left with a slaw that’s so full of flavor it becomes addicting. Cole slaw…addicting? Yes.

And this one’s fresher than ever.

Asian Cabbage Slaw

While you could certainly down an entire bowl of this, it pairs nicely on the side of other dishes, too. Think fish tacos, or a stir-fry of sorts or even an Asian-themed veggie burger on the grill. It’s up to you to get creative with what you put this with, but I promise the recipe laid out for you here won’t let you down!

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Beet Soup with Tahini and Pine Nut Za’atar

Beet Soup with Tahini and Pine Nut Za’atar

Does soup get any more gorgeous than this? I knew immediately after seeing this on Dishing Up the Dirt that I needed to whip up this vibrant creation for my own spoon and bowl.

Beets always yield such beauty.

Beets

Beets really do lend themselves well to easily dazzling up a dinner. Here are a few past favorites that deck out the kitchen table in red: Pickled Beets, Smoky Black Bean and Beet Burgers with Herb Yogurt Sauce, Purple Summer Tabbouleh.

I’m adding this soup to the list.

Beet Soup with Tahini and Pine Nut Za’atar

Beyond feeling decadent from pure looks alone, this soup has a nice earthy flavor that gets complimented by some rather stellar toppings. First, there’s the tahini. You can almost always count me in for tahini-topped anything, and it’s creamy combination with beets is no different. This particular sauce adds a slight lemony-tang to the sweet beets, and is absolutely perfect with the specks of parsley you’ll catch on most bites. Feel free to omit the allspice from the sauce – it’ll add subtle, but not mandatory, notes of flavor.

Beets

Then, there’s the za’atar, a traditional Middle Eastern herb and spice blend that is speckled with sesame seeds. Toasted in a pan with pine nuts, it takes on this woodsy flavor that’s hard to describe as anything but unique. Here, it adds an easy punch of flavor that allows this soup to remain simple to make, and to rely on the freshness of its garden ingredients.

Beet Soup with Tahini and Pine Nut Za’atar

But enough words already. Likely, if you’re going to make this soup, it was its visual representation that snagged your eye. Bring its beauty to your own bowl, might I suggest alongside a crusty, toasty slice of bread.

Beets

P.S. Stop by Andrea’s blog, Dishing Up the Dirt, if you get the chance. It’s a winner.

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Avocado Radish Toasts

Avocado Radish Toasts

You know spring has arrived when there are 7 different street festivals swarming the streets of your one city, all within one Saturday. When your local park is carpeted in pink pedals of the cherry trees after several days of showers. When you look down and notice you’ve gotten a bit of a sunburn after just 2 hours of tennis. When the first farmer’s markets kick off. And when, there, you stumble upon beautiful bunches of radishes.

Spring radishes

The weather is here. The flowers are here. And my favorite – the first smell of fresh-cut grass, a perfume I walked by literally an hour ago, has arrived and bestowed me with this evening’s biggest smile.

Radishes sliced

There are few vegetables I find more stunning than radishes. And they feel rather novel too. Rarely do I eat a radish outside of springtime.

When they are in season though, and just picked from the ground – still young, small, not fully matured – little else can beat how refreshing that crispness of theirs brings to the table. A spring rain rooted radish, yes please.

Sliced radishes

Along with all those seasonal festivals I mentioned earlier comes the arrival of countless picnic-themed holidays, on their way shortly. Next up is Mother’s Day, soon after followed by Memorial Day, and so on, and so on, and so on.

How to prepare for those occasions? Have a radish-inspired recipe you can count on. One that literally takes barely any effort at all to pull together.

Toasted Baguette

When you have quality ingredients, you only need a few ingredients to make a dish that’s memorable.

Fresh radishes. Ripe avocados. Crusty bread. Good olive oil. Coarse salt.

All favorited ingredients of my repertoire.

Avocado Radish Toasts

Pull them all together, and you create this, a recipe perfect for any picnic, potluck, or simple outdoor, light-lunch occasion. (Don’t get me wrong, you can certainly enjoy this indoors as well. But in my dreams, I’m eating outside for all 3 meals of the day.)

Avocado and lime

Sorry (but not sorry) for the photo overload. Like short and sweet recipes that can be easily fantastic when quality ingredients are involved, beautiful photos always come easier with ingredients that inherently shine.

Avocado Radish Toasts

Fun fact – most of the spice (and flavor) of a radish lays in its skin. Early season ones should be pretty tame, but later on, if you can’t handle the heat, you can always give them a zebra-striped peel.

Avocado Radish Toast

A little bit of that heat though, and the corresponding crispness, goes great with creamy avocados, so make sure to hang on to some of it. Enjoy guys!

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Beet Pesto Pasta with Goat Cheese Over Arugula

Beet Pesto Pasta with Goat Cheese Over Arugula

Pink is not my color. And it really never has been.

As a kid, I preferred blue, which fared quite nicely for my parents who stuffed me in hand-me-downs from my brother. That’s okay. I wasn’t ever really a dress girl either. I was a tree-climbing wannabe tomboy. Scraped knees were better for keeping up that persona than pink dresses, as probably were oversized clothes.

The only time I did wear pink was when my parents dressed my 3-year-old self up in a puffy pink princess gown for a Halloween event. I took home first place at the event’s costume contest. That I’ll attribute to the itchy goldilocks wig they also placed atop my head. I haven’t worn pink since.

arugula

Today, I love dresses. And nail polish. And climbing trees too. Naturally, I’m a hodgepodge of my younger self and older years. Part lover of fashion, hater of shopping, adventurer of trees and urban landscape.

I still don’t love pink when it comes to clothes, but when it comes to the kitchen, I can’t get enough of it. There’s nothing uglier than a bright pink shirt (in most cases), but there’s little else more beautiful than a bowl of pink pasta. The beet-dyed strands like the ones pictured above make my heart melt for magenta.

Beet Pesto Pasta with Goat Cheese Over Arugula

This has been my year of the beet, which has infused a love, almost a need, for its color in any situation possible. A little goes a long way, like in this rice and quinoa tabbouleh, and the pesto recipe that follows.

Beet Pesto Pasta with Goat Cheese Over Arugula

Here, it keeps basil pesto from turning a putrid green, sweeping in with its dye to prevent any pitfalls of oxidization. The beet will add a slight earthiness to the pesto, but is far from prominent in flavor. Rather, it shines in its color, which pairs so naturally well with vibrant arugula and the amenable tones of pasta.

Arugula

The goat cheese is optional, so feel free to skip it all together if you’re vegan or dabbling in dairy-free. It adds a slight tang to play off the mild sweetness of the beets, but a few sliced tomatoes could work just as well.

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