Browsing Tag:

millet

Ratatouille with Herb Corn Topping

Ratatouille with Herb Corn Topping

After last post’s summer-in-a-bowl, I was immediately ready for round two.

When the growing seasons’s at its prime, produce combinations fare to rarely ever bore me. As [insert singer of your choice here] says, “Gotta get it while the gettin’s good.”

In the August, the garden is good, and my fork is gettin’ it.

Ratatouille with Herb Corn Topping

Ratatouille remains a yearly favorite. It’s easy. It’s flexible. It’s quick, healthy, beautiful, and a million other adjectives.

To it, you can add chickpeas. You could add eggplant. You could add fresh thyme, pair it with bread, or top it with cheese. None of this I did. But you could, if you so please.

That’s the beauty of ratatouille.

Ratatouille with Herb Corn Topping

For my ratatouille, I generally do a combination of summer squash, tomatoes, onions and eggplant. I didn’t have eggplant available this time around, but I did have corn, so I whipped up this fancy-but-not-actually-fancy topping.

The corn adds an extra sweetness and crunch, which pairs well with the creamy grains placed beneath it. It’s also adds just one extra summery touch to a bowl full of already natural August goodness.

Ratatouille with Herb Corn Topping

Again, when veggies are fresh and local, you really needn’t do much to them but put them together and let their flavors swim free. Ready in 45 minutes or less (depending on your grain choice), this recipe lends itself well to a weeknight meal that’ll leave you feeling great. Pair with a side of protein, or sprinkle some toasted walnuts on top and call it a meal. Then most importantly, let your fork get in on that good.

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Breakfast Millet with Peanut, Ginger & Turmeric Apple Compote

Breakfast Millet with Peanut, Ginger, & Turmeric Apple Compote

I’ve been on a turmeric kick lately, which is great because there are 101 health benefits associated with it. It’s a huge antioxidant-powered anti-inflammatory, meaning it can aid in everything from reducing arthritis pain to heart disease prevention.

It’s also frequently used in Chinese Medicine to treat depression, and it’s been shown to delay liver damage. With how brutal this winter’s been, it’s no wonder I’ve been consuming so much of the stuff. How else am I going to counteract all that alcohol I’ve been consuming as a result of my snow-induced depression? Kidding of course.

I will admit, however, a ginger-lemon-honey-turmeric tonic makes a great morning choice after a night out on the town. As does this breakfast.

Breakfast Millet with Peanut, Ginger, & Turmeric Apple Compote

In drink form or not, my turmeric intake often goes hand in hand with my ginger intake. The two make great partners in the kitchen, both in terms of health and flavor rationale. (Ginger’s another one of those anti-inflammatory, detoxifying godsends.)

Thus, it seemed only natural to take them to my apples for a Saturday morning breakfast. Sweetened with a little raw honey, which gets counter-balanced with a little lime, this brings a wonderful way to wake up. Plus, did I mention there’s peanut butter in this? Is there any better way to wake up than with that? For this PB-junkie, the answer is no.

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Millet Cauliflower Caraway “Mashed Potatoes”

Cauliflower Millet Mash

Cauliflower is trendy. It’s become the hip, harlem shakin‘, Sriracha loving, Ray-Ban wearing vegetable of 2013. It’s hot on demand and is quickly sneaking its way onto restaurant menus nationwide. Can’t say I predicted that.

I could’ve predicted the past year’s kale boom, the one that’s quietly beginning to slow. Leafy, vibrant greens packed with nutrients – it was only a matter of time before they shifted beyond garnish status on the plate. This whole cauliflower craze though, it really snuck up on me. I definitely didn’t see the day coming where cauliflower “steak” would push beef aside and become the highlight of a menu (at $34 a plate)! I could certainly argue with that price, but cauliflower shining across menus is fine by me.

Cauliflower doesn’t make my grocery list all that often, but I admit, its crowns have been the favored ones ever since I was kid. My mom would often steam it up alongside broccoli, the green monster I’d grimace at after every bite. For the cauliflower, however, there was never any kind of the “you won’t get dessert if you don’t eat…” convincing needed. Today, I probably eat more of the green crowns than the white, but again I admit, cauliflower is still the favored one. Cauliflower Millet Mash

Its relatively neutral flavor makes it great for dishes like this (and apparently pizza crust too!). Here, cauliflower is paired with a slightly nutty millet, and then whipped up in a food processor. The result is a creamy, mashed potato-like texture yielded without any butter or cream needed. In fact, you could call this a no-fat version of mashed potatoes, although with the caraway seeds, it’ll bring just a tad more complexity to the table. Feel free to skip the seeds altogether if you’re looking for a neutral side or straight-up mashed potato replacement. However, I find the caraway to really add a nice, unique element you seldom find outside of rye bread.

I served this up with a batch of sautéed baby portabella mushrooms and garlic. To do the same, simply slice up  8 oz. baby portabellas along with a couple of garlic cloves. Saute in a little olive oil, deglazing the pan with a splash of balsamic vinegar, and seasoning with salt and pepper. Feel free to add in thyme or other herbs, or keep it simple and let the millet mash speak for itself. The mushrooms will add a nice depth of texture to the velvety smooth cauliflower. Continue Reading…

Multigrain “Scones”

Obvious just by looking at the picture above, this recipe did not exactly produce the traditional scone to which I’m accustomed. Obtained from Dr. Weil and Rosie Daley’s The Healthy Kitchen cookbook, I knew just by glancing at the ingredients list that this recipe wouldn’t necessarily yield “scones” like it purported. But the healthy ingredients were what hooked me into throwing them all together regardless, and the results actually weren’t too bad. In fact, they were rather quite delicious, which is why I’ve decided to post the recipe, even if its name is a little misleading.

Besides, names are just labels attached to items far more meaningful than their titles. So let’s throw this one out and give it a new one. I’d probably re-label these as multigrain cookies, housing a crispy golden outside with a fluffy, cake-like inside. What makes them so special is the delicate crunch they contain, given from the millet—A grain special in itself, full of fiber and trace minerals. The cookies also have both hints of lemon and sugar, without being overbearingly sweet.

Soymilk, oats, chia, bran…these multigrain cookies make for a great breakfast or snack. Next time I think I’d try swapping out the white flour with whole wheat flour for an even extra boost of fiber. The texture didn’t resemble a scone anyways, so I’d like to see what whole wheat flour would do. Try adding some nuts in as well if you desire an even extra element of crunch.

Slightly modified version of Rosie’s Multigrain Scones

-1 egg
-1/2 cup sugar
-5 Tbsp. safflower oil
-1 lemon, zested
-1/2 cup oatmeal
-1/4 cup wheat bran
-1 1/2 cups unbleached white flour
-2 Tbsp. millet
-1 Tbsp. chia seeds
-1/2 tsp. salt
-1 Tbsp. baking powder
-1/2 tsp. cinnamon
-1/2 cup soy milk

Lemon Topping

-3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice
-1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar

Preheat oven 375F.

Whisk egg, sugar, and oil together in a bowl. Mix the lemon zest and all of the dry ingredients together in a separate bowl and stir with wooden spoon until throughly combined. Slowly add the dry ingredients into the egg, sugar and oil and mix to create a thick dough. Add the milk and mix well.

Lightly grease a baking sheet. Scoop tablespoons of the dough and drop them into mounds on the baking sheet, dividing the batter to make 10 scones. Leave 2 inches of space in between each mound. Bake for 15-20 minutes, just until crust is barely golden brown and dough is dry. Remove from oven and let cool for 10 minutes.

With a fork, mix the Lemon Topping ingredients until sugar is dissolved. Drizzle 1 tablespoon over each scone.