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slaw

Soba Noodles with Carrot-Cabbage Slaw and Peanut Sauce

Soba Noodles with Carrot-Cabbage Slaw and Peanut Sauce

I eat much peanut butter almost every morning. On oatmeal days, at least two tablespoons are swirled into my bowl, and sometimes more.

Unfortunately, this means that it’s a rare occasion that peanut butter gets incorporated into other meals. But those occasions are always cherished.

There are plenty of reasons to add peanut butter to lunch and dinner.

Peanut Sauce

One of my favorite savory forums for the ingredient is a gingery, garlicky peanut sauce. If you have a food processor, its assembly is almost as easy as spooning peanut butter onto a banana.

Soba Noodles with Carrot-Cabbage Slaw and Peanut Sauce

Once you make the sauce, you’ll find that the remainder of this recipe is even simpler. If you’re looking for more, add some steamed edamame or tofu sautéed in soy sauce.

Topping choices can also get creative. Scallions, chopped peanuts or cashews, extra cilantro, and a squeeze of lime are all favorites. And I do love a squeeze of Sriracha, too.

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Tofu Banh Mi Collard Wraps with Wasabi Peanut Sauce

Tofu Bahn Mi Collard Wraps

Certain neighborhoods of Philly are infiltrated with Banh mi. The classic Vietnamese sandwich essentially acts as the Chipotle of the Asian food world, but even cheaper. You walk in, select your “meat”, and leave within 5-10 minutes with an aluminum wrapped, $5 foot-long sandwich, ready to be eaten. It’s a great feeling.

Scallions

Since it’s so easy to pick up a Banh mi around Philly, I rarely take the time to make it. Yet, it’s hands-down one of my favorites of the sandwich world, and so on the occasion that I’m getting a simultaneous desire for both Banh mi and a chef’s knife in my hand, I put on my cooking hat and grab my own tofu to be canvassed.

Tofu Bahn Mi Collard Wraps

When Banh mi making is going down in my kitchen, you can nearly guarantee it’s going to have a little flair to it. What’s the point of making the original version when I can grab that anytime, with little detriment to my bank account?  Besides, if I’m recreating a dish, I’m always about finding further ways to maximize its flavor since the ingredient make-up lays entirely in my hands. No doubt, that’s going on with this recipe. Wassuppppp wasabi?

Tofu Bahn Mi Collard Wraps

I don’t eat a ton of white bread, but when it comes to Banh Mi, a chewy white roll will always oust a whole wheat counterpart. This is one instance where whole wheat just won’t work. The flavor is unfortunately just too overpowering.

Collard wraps, on the other hand, those can create some Banh Mi magic.

CollardWraps_blog11

Here, collard wraps are able to balance the delicate freshness of the traditional Banh mi composition, while adding an even extra layer of freshness on top of it all. It lightens up the whole meal, while enabling more flavor to shine through. Peel back that one-inch layer of bread, and the notes of deliciousness from the slaw, cilantro and other jamboree of ingredients are able to reach their fullest potential.

Shredded carrots

Be patient with the tofu, and make sure it gets a nice crisp so it can add that contrast to the creamy peanut sauce you’ll place beneath it.

For a fun, spicy twist, this peanut sauce receives a generous punch of wasabi that’ll make it stand out among other sauces. I love the flavor it brings to the subtle sweetness of the peanuts and the carrots.

CollardWraps_blogmontage

True to the grab-and-go nature of banh mi — but more so with the intention to make your wrap-eating a little less messy! — envelope your collard packages in aluminum foil. This will seal in all the flavors so they don’t end up on your shirt. Although, if you’re like me, that’ll probably happen anyway.

I brought that big pile up above into work last week, and served it with a slide of Asian slaw for my coworkers. Two thumbs up, all around.

Since these are destined for pre-packaging, this will makes a great recipe for your own workweek lunch. While best the first day, the wraps can certainly withstand being rolled up the night before and kept in the fridge till you head out.

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Asian Cabbage Slaw with Basil and Ginger

Asian Cabbage Slaw with Ginger and Basil

My blog is going on a 2 week vacation, while its author heads to the West Coast. (Hello California and Portland!) Before it says a brief adieu, however, we are leaving you with this excellent summertime recipe.

Asian Cabbage Slaw with Ginger and Basil

Have no fear if cabbages are ransacking your garden, farmers’ market or CSA share, and you haven’t a clue what to do with them. I can relate. Hence why I’m hoping to help you out here with this recipe before I jet-set away for a few.

That blank state of mind seems to be a yearly occurrence for me when cabbages starting forming into bowling balls by the masses. I really do enjoy cabbage. But what do you make with it that will use it up fast enough? A few shreds on top of some fish tacos won’t begin to peel off those layers. Nor will most pasta sautes and other recipes where cabbage comes in handy.

Of course the simple answer is coleslaw.

Cabbage

While as I said I love cabbage, there’s only so much coleslaw I can tolerate. Cabbage by the masses paired with mayo by the masses ends in feelings of eventual repulsion for the leafy veg.

Not that I’m a mayo-hater or anything. I just can’t eat it with slaw on a regular basis until my family and friends’ gardens stop crying me cabbage.

This Asian slaw however? It’s something my fork could get down with daily. Especially in the summer when almost every lunch/dinner screams for a crunchy, cool salad.

Asian Cabbage Slaw with Ginger and Basil

I like this because it’s refreshing, yet each bite hits you with an immense amount of flavor. You get sesame paired with summer basil, and a slightly sweet and spicy kick from the rice vinegar paired with the ginger. Use a food processor to make its assembly easy, and feel free to top with roasted peanuts or any other garnish of your choice.

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Sautéed Brussels Sprouts with Apples, Pomegranate and Pecans

Sautéed Brussels Sprouts with Apples, Pomegranate and Pecans

I never fully committed to the cauliflower rage of 2013, but I’ve somehow unintentionally joined the brussels sprout bandwagon. They’ve graced more than three holiday parties I’ve attended in the past few months, and Christmas hasn’t even hit yet. Good thing this recipe’s perfect for that occasion, decked in all the red and green cheer you could ever want on one spoon.

Brussels Sprouts

I like to ensure that there’s at least one healthy item on the holiday table, meaning I usually show up to every party with a vegetable in hand. Don’t get me wrong, I love, love, love to bake, and the occasional holiday decadence as well. But that’s why I have two hands. One for plates of cookies, the other for bowls of veggies.

Sautéed Brussels Sprouts with Apples, Pomegranate and Pecans

In the event that everyone else fills their two hands with decadence (no judging, I promise!), I’m coming prepared. This winter, that means brussels sprouts for every occasion.

The dish pictured above is topped with a double crunch, stemming from beautiful red pomegranate seeds and fragrant toasted pecans. A simple citrus vinaigrette with subtle notes of orange furthers its festive energy, and completes its salad-like semblance.

Next up to plate is New Years Eve, a day I have yet to plan out in terms of sprouts. Any ideas? I’d love to hear your favorite ways to enjoy them, and how you’ve been cooking/roasting them up lately. Do tell!

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