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spicy

Homemade Jalapeno Hot Sauce

Homemade Jalapeno Hot Sauce

Holy hot sauce, what a crazy month! Things have been moving here at the FFF headquarters, and tomorrow I’m venturing off to Montreal for a few days…Did someone say bagels?!

Jalapenos

Before I go, I wanted to welcome the first day of fall on here together, and since I’m not ready for any sort of cool weather just yet, I’m bring you something a little fiery instead.

Whip a batch of this up with the last of the summer season’s jalapeños, and pull it out on the first real cool day. They say warm climates call for spicy foods, but I’m telling you, a spoonful of this is bound to make you feel all warm inside. At the very least, your tongue will feel the fire.

Homemade Jalapeno Hot Sauce

Perfect for fish tacos, breakfast tacos, portobello tacos, any kind of tacos…this recipe lends itself to a wide range of uses, as long as you like spicy. It’ll make about 16 ounces, so be prepared to enter a lot of hot sauce eating competitions with your friends. Or just pull out some small freezer containers like I did, and divide it on up.

Homemade Jalapeno Hot Sauce

P.S. You can expect more squash-filled, appley, autumn-inspired recipes soon. In the meantime, I’m still hanging onto summer.

Homemade Jalapeno Hot Sauce

Homemade Jalapeno Hot Sauce

Recipe via All Recipes

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp. vegetable oil
  • 20 fresh jalapeño peppers, sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ cup minced onion
  • ¾ tsp. salt
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup distilled white vinegar

Instructions

  1. In a medium glass or enamel lined sauce pan over high heat, combine oil, peppers, garlic, onion and salt; sauté for 4 minutes. Add the water and cook for 20 minutes, stirring often. Remove from heat and allow mixture to cool to room temperature.
  2. Transfer the mixture to a food processor and purée until smooth. With the processor running, slowly add the vinegar. Pour into a sterilized jar with a tight lid. This sauce will keep for 6 months when stored in the refrigerator.
http://foodfitnessfreshair.com/2015/09/23/homemade-jalapeno-hot-sauce/
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Spicy Spinach Hummus

Spicy Spinach Hummus

Hummus-making used to be a weekly occurrence in my kitchen. It’s just so fantastically easy and delicious. I’m not sure how I let the ritual run away from me.

I’m happy to say hummus and I have reunited with this green-laced recipe, which I hope will entice you to unite with garbanzos and your food processor as well.

Spicy Spinach Hummus

Hot peppers are a beautiful thing.

Here, they take hummus to the next notch, adding a nice subtle flavor and spice that will make your spread unique in an elegant way. Don’t worry, this isn’t going to make your eyes water. (That is, unless you take your contacts out after handling the peppers…still waiting for the day when I’ll remember not to do that.)

The spice here is moderately mild, and in fact, you may even want to keep the Sriracha on hand if you looking for a little extra fire. Again, it’s the hints of flavor that you’ll note from the peppers that make them special in this spread.

Spicy Spinach Hummus

With just a simple whiz in the food processor, this recipe comes together fast. No roasting, toasting, or fancy stuff is needed to make it complete. But of course, feel free to experiment. That is the beauty of cooking. Want to try roasting those hot peppers? Toasting the cumin seeds? Adding other greens?

Do it, and share with me how it turns out. Cheers.

Spicy Spinach Hummus

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Tofu Banh Mi Collard Wraps with Wasabi Peanut Sauce

Tofu Bahn Mi Collard Wraps

Certain neighborhoods of Philly are infiltrated with Banh mi. The classic Vietnamese sandwich essentially acts as the Chipotle of the Asian food world, but even cheaper. You walk in, select your “meat”, and leave within 5-10 minutes with an aluminum wrapped, $5 foot-long sandwich, ready to be eaten. It’s a great feeling.

Scallions

Since it’s so easy to pick up a Banh mi around Philly, I rarely take the time to make it. Yet, it’s hands-down one of my favorites of the sandwich world, and so on the occasion that I’m getting a simultaneous desire for both Banh mi and a chef’s knife in my hand, I put on my cooking hat and grab my own tofu to be canvassed.

Tofu Bahn Mi Collard Wraps

When Banh mi making is going down in my kitchen, you can nearly guarantee it’s going to have a little flair to it. What’s the point of making the original version when I can grab that anytime, with little detriment to my bank account?  Besides, if I’m recreating a dish, I’m always about finding further ways to maximize its flavor since the ingredient make-up lays entirely in my hands. No doubt, that’s going on with this recipe. Wassuppppp wasabi?

Tofu Bahn Mi Collard Wraps

I don’t eat a ton of white bread, but when it comes to Banh Mi, a chewy white roll will always oust a whole wheat counterpart. This is one instance where whole wheat just won’t work. The flavor is unfortunately just too overpowering.

Collard wraps, on the other hand, those can create some Banh Mi magic.

CollardWraps_blog11

Here, collard wraps are able to balance the delicate freshness of the traditional Banh mi composition, while adding an even extra layer of freshness on top of it all. It lightens up the whole meal, while enabling more flavor to shine through. Peel back that one-inch layer of bread, and the notes of deliciousness from the slaw, cilantro and other jamboree of ingredients are able to reach their fullest potential.

Shredded carrots

Be patient with the tofu, and make sure it gets a nice crisp so it can add that contrast to the creamy peanut sauce you’ll place beneath it.

For a fun, spicy twist, this peanut sauce receives a generous punch of wasabi that’ll make it stand out among other sauces. I love the flavor it brings to the subtle sweetness of the peanuts and the carrots.

CollardWraps_blogmontage

True to the grab-and-go nature of banh mi — but more so with the intention to make your wrap-eating a little less messy! — envelope your collard packages in aluminum foil. This will seal in all the flavors so they don’t end up on your shirt. Although, if you’re like me, that’ll probably happen anyway.

I brought that big pile up above into work last week, and served it with a slide of Asian slaw for my coworkers. Two thumbs up, all around.

Since these are destined for pre-packaging, this will makes a great recipe for your own workweek lunch. While best the first day, the wraps can certainly withstand being rolled up the night before and kept in the fridge till you head out.

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Zucchini Noodles with Summer Sauce and Avocado Cream

Zucchini Noodles with Summer Sauce and Avocado Cream

Pasta la vista wheat noodles. There’s a new, much lighter, more summery, awesome-sauce pasta in town. And it goes by the name of Zucchini Noodles.

Today, I’m sending a hello to the early August garden. With it is coming a hello to noodles in my bowl that allow me to go in for seconds, maybe even thirds, without feeling weighed or wheated down.

The zucchini noodle is one that’s taken the Internet world by a rage, and I’m coming with it –and for good reason, too.

Zucchini Noodles with Summer Sauce and Avocado Cream

Similar to my coconut flake mission I described for this recipe, my mission for finding a julienne peeler to make these noodles was not a short one. Many steps were taken, and many stores were visited for the making of this recipe. Fortunately, no humans were harmed, even after a slight hangryness set in.

Apparently in Philadelphia, kitchen stores like to take off the very same days that this girl likes to create a big, food-filled mess in the kitchen. So on Sunday, off I went by foot to three different places across the city until I finally came across the right peeler to craft this recipe. Well worth it, I assure you.

I also assure you it shouldn’t be that hard to find the tool you need for zucchini noodles, nor will it be expensive. Most kitchen stores have julienne peelers, which do the trick, and mine cost me just $8. You can also use a tool called a Spiralizer, but don’t ask me about the specifics. I chose to go for the cheaper and smaller option, i.e., the peeler.

Zucchini Noodles

You should find the julienne peeler rather easy to use. Simply place your zucchini on a flat surface, and slide its blade from one end to the other. Repeat until you get down to the end.

I placed my leftover zucchini scraps that didn’t make it through the peeler right into the blender to make my avocado cream. Just give them a quick chop, and they should easily meld into the cream.

With a bowl full of the whole summer garden – sweet corn, juicy tomatoes, fresh herbs – this is a good place to start the zucchini noodle marathon that’s bound to follow. Here, you get a whole bunch of fresh ingredients to keep things light, but also a richness from the avocado that pulls it all together. For presentation purposes, keep it all separate like pictured below. But you’ll definitely want to give everything a good mixing with your fork before diving in. Let me know what you think!

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Spicy Peanut Sauce with Noodles


As an obsessive peanut butter lover, I’m naturally a diehard fan of peanut sauce too. If you haven’t had it, well, you’re missing out. (Unless you have a peanut allergy, in which case, I’d pass on this one).

Peanut butter creates a naturally creamy base that lathers up pasta and gives it a rich massage of flavor. Toasted sesame oil, the PB’s sidekick in this dish, contributes that classic roasted infusion of Asian flavor and aroma to the sauce. Then some ginger and chili garlic sauce come in to spice things up a bit. If spicy isn’t your forte, simply use less of the chili garlic sauce.

I pair the peanutty sauce with soba noodles, which while aren’t essential, definitely enhance the dish. Soba noodles contain a combination of buckwheat and wheat flour, which give them a nutty taste and a unique, elastic texture. They are the perfect noodle to stand up to the intensiveness of the sauce (vs. white pasta) without taking away from any of the flavor (vs. whole wheat pasta).

Cabbage and red peppers lighten up the dish a bit, packing it with an element of nutritious freshness. While this dish is intended to be served warm, it’s equally as tasty at room temp., or slightly chilled.

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