Browsing Tag:

spread

Spicy Spinach Hummus

Spicy Spinach Hummus

Hummus-making used to be a weekly occurrence in my kitchen. It’s just so fantastically easy and delicious. I’m not sure how I let the ritual run away from me.

I’m happy to say hummus and I have reunited with this green-laced recipe, which I hope will entice you to unite with garbanzos and your food processor as well.

Spicy Spinach Hummus

Hot peppers are a beautiful thing.

Here, they take hummus to the next notch, adding a nice subtle flavor and spice that will make your spread unique in an elegant way. Don’t worry, this isn’t going to make your eyes water. (That is, unless you take your contacts out after handling the peppers…still waiting for the day when I’ll remember not to do that.)

The spice here is moderately mild, and in fact, you may even want to keep the Sriracha on hand if you looking for a little extra fire. Again, it’s the hints of flavor that you’ll note from the peppers that make them special in this spread.

Spicy Spinach Hummus

With just a simple whiz in the food processor, this recipe comes together fast. No roasting, toasting, or fancy stuff is needed to make it complete. But of course, feel free to experiment. That is the beauty of cooking. Want to try roasting those hot peppers? Toasting the cumin seeds? Adding other greens?

Do it, and share with me how it turns out. Cheers.

Spicy Spinach Hummus

Continue Reading…

Breakfast Bagels with Baba Ganoush

Breakfast Bagels with Baba Ganoush

I really do love bagels. Often, I have my mom’s voice ringing in the back of my head saying, “Oatmeal is a better choice”. But then I just push it away, because bagels are worth it. Especially on Saturday and Sunday mornings.

Breakfast Bagels with Baba Ganoush

Besides, when you use bagels as a canvas for garden veggies, they can be considered an excellent choice, right? Maybe even better than oatmeal.  Don’t worry mom, that’s a whole wheat everything bagel plated below.

And it’s loaded with creamy baba ganoush.

Breakfast Bagels with Baba Ganoush

Recently, I’ve been using bagels as a platform for vine ripened tomatoes, spilling out over a nice smear of cream cheese and layered with sweet onions. It’s what I consider a perfect breakfast. Throw a farm fried egg on the side, and breakfast feels flawless. Cue Beyonce: I woke up to this.

Breakfast Bagels with Baba Ganoush

The days of huge tomato harvests are beginning to slow down though, just as eggplants are quickly populating the nearby plants. Those purple guys were the inspiration for ditching the cream cheese in favor of a new kind of spread.

Buttery baba ganoush on a chewy toasted bagel – it’s a match made in heaven, no cream cheese needed. Feel free to keep it vegan, or throw some salty feta on top. I recommend some chopped tomatoes, too, if you have them.

Continue Reading…

Slow Cooked Garlic and Greens Tapenade

Slow Cooked Garlic and Greens TapenadeKristen Miglore and Merrill Stubbs of the Food52 crew swung through Philadelphia a couple weeks ago to promote their newest book, Genius Recipes: 100 Recipes That Will Change the Way You Cook. 

My friend and fellow Philly food blogger, Emily, and I jumped at the opportunity, of course, to go hear them speak. And afterwards, we gushed over the ten trillion genius recipes we had to recreate from the book.

Slow Cooked Garlic and Greens Tapenade

This was spun off of one of those recipes, the famous Food52 posted “Broccoli Cooked Forever” from Chef Roy Finamore. It was a strange-sounding idea that involved cooking broccoli for, well, forever (2 hours) and adding in a bunch of olive oil and anchovies. Sounds…errr…kinda gross, right? Yeah, that was my thought, too.

Yet, the ladies from Food52, a food site I absolutely adore, were raving about this creation. So much so that they’ve bestowed it with the title of “genius”. The commenters on the online version of the recipe, (it can be found in the cookbook as well), were raving about it too. Naturally, I was intrigued and had to try it for myself.

Slow Cooked Garlic and Greens Tapenade

Intrigued — but with no available broccoli in my house. Yet, vested with a TON of tough summer greens growing in my garden. And so began the birth of this recipe, which I might have to label as an unforeseen amazement…if not downright ingenious.

Slow Cooked Garlic and Greens Tapenade

What better way to beat late season toughness out of greens than to cook them forever? Okay, so in my version, I only make you sit through 60 minutes of cooking time because, let’s be real, while broccoli might reach the consistency of butter, collard greens aren’t ever going to get there. They will, however, reach a buttery, super tender texture, which can be achieved within just an hour of simmer time. Voila.

Placed on top of crusty bread with a grating of fresh Parm and a few chopped tomatoes to cut the richness of the olive oil, I think this may have become my new greens go-to. I’ll definitely be making this dish again soon.

Trust me, it may sound a little strange,but I promise, it’s…brilliant!(?)

Continue Reading…

Jerusalem’s Butternut Squash and Tahini Spread

Jerusalem's Butternut Squash and Tahini Spread

One of my roommates recently picked up the Jerusalem cookbook. It’s always been one of my favorites to peruse, along with Ottolenghi’s other book, Plenty. I’ve never owned either of the books but have many friends who do, and from their pages, I have loved pretty much every recipe I’ve had the pleasure of helping to recreate.

Mediterranean cuisine may just be my favorite. And Jerusalem is packed with quality ingredients that bring this style of eating to life.

Winter Butternut

The first Ottolenghi recipe I ever made was essentially the non-pureed form of the one typed out below. That initial dish, a baked butternut and roasted red onion side, is one I make often. It introduced me to the heavenly combination of creamy tahini and nutty squash, which I knew wouldn’t let me down in this recipe.

Jerusalem's Butternut Squash and Tahini Spread

Here, that duo is topped with an intriguing addition – date syrup, or as an alternate, molasses. The cookbook explains that date syrup is an intense, natural popular sweetener in the Middle East, and is great for salad dressings, to sweeten stews, or to drizzle over morning porridge. While I am curious to seek that out, the recipe says that the date syrup can be also be swapped for molasses. I decided to go with the latter, one, out of convenience, but also two, because I love molasses yet feel it’s a rather underutilized ingredient in my kitchen. It, too, felt like a surprise ingredient for the dish, and I thought it worked quite well.

Winter Still Life

Creamy and intense, this essentially turns tahini into something that I would eat by the spoonful. However, it’s rich, and is even better when smeared across a crusty bread. Next time, I might add cayenne for some heat, and possibly even a bit of lime or balsamic to cut it a little bit further. Overall though, this was a hit, and would certainly act as a conversation starter if serving to guests. It has this whole sweet-meets-savory dynamic that begs for questions, and also double dipping. Definitely adding this one to the repeat list. Again, another one from Jerusalem that doesn’t disappoint.

Jerusalem's Butternut Squash and Tahini Spread Continue Reading…

Sun-dried Tomato and Pesto Hummus

Sun-dried Tomato Pesto Hummus

Like fireworks on the 4th of July, when hummus meets basil, you get an explosion. Replace the fire with flavor, and I think you’ll get what I mean.

Pesto is my summer jam, and hummus is my year-round lunch buddy. Combining the two spreads seemed natural, and as I’ve discovered, works to create one of my favorite matches. It’s also a quick go-to of mine for picnics and potlucks, and may just make it onto tomorrow’s tableclothed agenda.

Honestly, I feel like you can rarely go wrong when adding pesto to a savory dish. It’s a highly flavorful spread, yet its intensity is rarely offensive to anyone. Pesto is no puttanesca. It’s not made from any sort of divisive ingredient like stinky anchovies or soapy cilantro. (Although, I quite like both of those myself). Rather, pesto is a garlic and basil beast, and if you don’t like those two ingredients, then you might as well leave my blog. Just kidding. But in all seriousness, I’m not sure I’ve met anyone yet who doesn’t like pesto. If this were the case, my jaw would likely be waiting for me on the floor. (Side note: I have met a few folks who have a hatred for guacamole. I consider myself lucky to still have that lower jaw of mine attached.)

In short, pesto is a people-pleaser. Combine it with hummus, and toss in a few sun-dried tomatoes, and your picnic dish is sure to get eaten up. Just make sure to whip up a little extra and leave it at home for yourself. This makes for a great, portable lunchtime meal that will store well all week.

Continue Reading…